ATLANTA, GA - SEPTEMBER 17:  Singer/Songwriter Justin Bieber performs at the 33rd Annual Georgia Music Hall Of Fame Awards at
Rick Diamond

Two days before his 18th birthday, Justin Bieber is having beaver problems.

According to The Hollywood Reporter, App developer RC3 is suing the pop superstar on grounds that its "Joustin' Beaver" app is protected by the First Amendment, regardless of any trademark rights the singer has to his own name.

Wait, what? They're suing him?

Two weeks ago, Bieb's lawyers, who we'll just assume are the world's busiest attorneys these past two years, sent a cease-and-desist to RC3 threatening to sue if the app wasn't terminated. RC3 fired back, claiming the game is a parody and thus protected under the First Amendment. Both parties tried to come to an agreement, according to the article, but were unable to settle on terms. And yes, it's okay to laugh at the thought of Justin Bieber negotiating with a Beaver version of himself.

In the game, according to the suit, "The beaver knocks 'Phot-Hogs' that are attempting to take his photograph into the river with his lance. The beaver also signs 'Otter-Graphs.' The beaver must also dodge the 'whirlpool of success' which will lead beaver out of control." Can you be sued for bad puns?

The article states that "The Bieber case, however, will likely turn on whether 'Joustin' Bieber' is likely to cause confusion as to the source and endorsement of the young heartthrob."

So to avoid confusion, I present this handy Fuse legal primer:

This is NOT Justin Bieber.

Joustin' Beaver video game character, not Justin Bieber

That is all.

What do you think? Does the lawsuit have legs? Is "Joustin Beaver" legal parody or trademark infringement? Sound off in the comments, especially if you're, you know, a lawyer.