LAS VEGAS - DECEMBER 3:  Death Cab for Cutie drummer Jason McGerr (L) and bassist Nick Harmer perform during a sold-out show
Ethan Miller

Death Cab for Cutie are going on tour this spring—and there’s no better time to see the Seattle-bred band live. Why? Because frontman Ben Gibbard is going through a divorce with Zooey Deschanel. So you can bet those weepy songs will never sound so damn sincere and heartbroken. Hey, Gibbard’s loss; your gain.

And there are more reasons to see indie rock’s softest softies: the quartet are bringing along San Francisco’s Magik*Magik Orchestra, the in-house ensemble for singer-songwriter John Vanderslice's Tiny Telephone Studios, which played the string arrangements on DCFC’s latest release, Codes and Keys, and have also worked with Mike Patton, the Walkmen and the Dodos. Expect their lofty accompaniment to pluck the heartstrings. Still not enough for you to drop the Wii controller and head to the closest venue? You lazy, lazy sicko. Well, how about this: DCFC have tapped two totally rad bands to open. 

Minnesota indie vets Low, a trio led by husband-and-wife Alan Sparhawk and Mimi Parker, channel their slow, minimalist sound into emotive pop bliss on their latest album, C'mon, and are also reknowned for their spectacular live shows. But it’s Youth Lagoon, who will open the tour's second leg, that deserve your undivided attention. The Boise, Idaho group’s The Year of Hibernation was hands down one of the best, if not the best, debut of 2011. Recorded in singer-guitarist Trevor Powers’ bedroom, it delivers a mountain of indie catharsis via electronics and an ocean of guitar and keyboard reverb, all washing over Powers’ yelping. It’s a sound that’s difficult to reproduce live, but Youth Lagoon deliver.

I suggest you be there when Death Cab and friends hit the road this spring. I will. Check out the complete tour dates here (another batch were announced today). And while you wait, watch DCFC’s video for “Grapevine Fires” and Youth Lagoon's clip for “July.”