You may have heard something about a band called Pussy Riot recently. But there’s much more to them than a controversial name. Here’s a quick rundown explaining who they are, what they stand for and why they're at the center of a massive controversy. 

Pussy Riot is a Russian punk band that formed last year in opposition of Vladimir Putin’s campaign for a third presidential term. (In Russia, there are term limits – two per president – but those can be circumvented if the president sits out a term, as Putin recently did). The group took to performing protests in various public places, most of which were met with minimal reaction from Russian officials. That is, until they protested inside of Moscow's Christ the Savior Cathedral on February 21st. The performance included some cursing and a prayer asking the Virgin Mary to prevent Putin’s re-election, but not much more. Despite the relative harmlessness of the protest, three of the members - Nadezhda Tolokonnikova, Mariya Alekhina and Yekaterina Samutsevic, two of whom are mothers of young children – were arrested and charged with “hooliganism,” which, if they’re convicted, could keep them in prison for up to seven years. The three women have remained in jail since their arrest.

Recently, the trio have received a ton of support from artists and musicians, including Madonna, who dedicated several minutes of her Moscow show to Pussy Riot. Other celebrity supporters include Bjork and Sting, and Amnesty International organized a protest concert in front of the Russian embassy in Washington D.C. Pussy Riot’s trial concluded this week, and a Russian judge is expected to issue a ruling on Friday.

Check out the video above for Dan Brown's take on the ordeal.