Kid Rock during Kid Rock in Concert - May 10, 2002 at Madison Square Garden in New York City, New York, United States. (Photo
Debra L Rothenberg

When Kid Rock appeared on Piers Morgan Live in 2011, Morgan asked why the singer refused to sell his music on iTunes. Rock responded, "I just don’t think that everything costs the same price. I think that’s un-American. Everything is not the same price at any level. There’s things that hold value and put value on it by money. That’s how our system works."

Seems like Rock has finally embraced Apple's Communist pinko sales manifesto that Marx and Engels fought so vigorously in favor of, as the singer's upcoming Rebel Soul album will be available on the service. According to Billboard, Rock could "no longer ignore how much money he was leaving on the table."

Rock's reluctance to join the service came, in part, from the ability to buy individual tracks on iTunes rather than the full album. But Billboard reports that Rebel Soul, the singer's ninth album set for release Nov. 19, will be available on a track-by-track basis.

In recent years, Rock hasn't been entirely anti-reality. The RNC performer sold his albums digitally through Amazon's MP3 store, but only as full albums. So for those of you rock n' roll enough for "Mr. Rock n' Roll" but not "God Save Rock n' Roll," your buying options are now limitless.