LOS ANGELES, CA - FEBRUARY 08: Musicians Patrick Stump (L) and Joe Trohman of Fall Out Boy backstage at the GRAMMYs Dial Glob
Rick Diamond

In his latest blog postFall Out Boy's Patrick Stump is taking aim at online haters who collectively and consistently dump on artists.

“How many people reading this are fans of Nickelback? How about Dane Cook?” he began.“Those questions are met with tumbleweeds and the distant sound of crickets. Like Creed or Limp Bizkit or the ‘Dude! You’re getting a Dell!’ kid, they've become ubiquitously hate-able.”

Stump added that he, like the rest of us, are “honor-bound by the unspoken law that, no matter what, I am not allowed to say anything positive about these artists.” 

“We derive our own identities from the act of hating," he wrote. "We connect on the things we are disappointed in.” 

Stump added that we'd rather diss Rebecca BlackJustin Bieber and Lady Gaga's meat dress than discuss the greatness of, say, Bilal’s latest album.

His post rightly lambasts online culture and the public's harsh judgement of one’s pop culture likes and dislikes. "We are literally made of the things we eat,” he posited in a food metaphor. “We don’t go into a grocery store and go ‘Ew! Hey, look at barbecue sauce! Don’t you just friggin’ hate barbecue sauce?’ No. If we don’t like it, we will quietly opt out of eating it."

"There’s not instant value judgement in removing yourself from the crowd of barbecue sauce lovers.”

Stump gets personal, too, revealing that he's felt the collective hate. “I can’t tell you how many times I (either as part of Fall Out Boy or as a solo artist) have asked another artist to tour or work together on a song and been shot down on the grounds of ‘Oh you guys are lame.’” Ouch!!

Stump ended the 10-paragraph post on a happy note by offering advice on how to better ourselves for the future.

“Perhaps we, as a culture, have exhausted (at least for a little while) whatever can positively be gained by ignorantly dismissing things as loudly as we can,” he wrote. “Next time I’m at the proverbial pop culture grocery store and someone offers me the proverbial barbecue sauce, I’ll politely decline and head to another aisle to purchase something I enjoy.”