MIAMI BEACH, FL - MARCH 10: Rick Ross is seen at the Reebok Classic gifting suite at Rick Ross' white party at Fontainebleau
Alexander Tamargo

As a life rule, you never want anyone to have to Google "your name + date rape," but here we are. 

Rick Ross has come under widespread criticism for lyrics on "U.O.E.N.O.," a new track by rapper Rocko, that appear to condone date rape. On the Future-assisted track, Rozay rhymes, "Put Molly all in her champagne/She ain’t even know it/I took her home and I enjoyed that/She ain't even know it."

The backlash was swift and resolute. A Change.org petition asking the rapper to "publicly apologize for glorifying 'date rape'." Shouts for Reebok to dump Ross as their spokesperson. Even Rap Genius, not exactly known for their anti-rapper stance, notes in their lyric explanation, "And rape by any other name…well, um, is rape."

Ross called into New Orleans radio station Q93.3 to offer a half-assed non-apology and "clear up" why not actually saying the word "rape" means it's fine to rhyme about drugging a girl and having sex with her while she's passed out.

Starting at 4:20, Ross is asked by a breathless DJ, just happy to be near the rapper, about the lyrics in question.

"I want to make sure this is clear: a woman is the most precious gift known to man," Ross says. "There was a misunderstanding with a lyric; a misinterpretation. The term 'rape' wasn't used. I would never use the term 'rape' in my records."

See, guys. He didn't actually say it. He just described how he would rape someone using a fashionable drug now popular in hip hop culture. So we're good, right?

Oh, we're not?

Go on, Rozay. 

"As far as my camp, hip hop don't condone that. The streets don't condone that. I just wanted to reach out to all the queens on my timeline; all the sexy ladies that had been reaching out to me with the misunderstanding. We don't condone rape and I'm not with that."

Ross failed to mention fellow Maybach Music Group member Meek Mill's verse on N.O.R.E.'s 2011 track "Scared Money," where the rapper rhymes, "If I ever go broke, I’ma take yo money/Have my n-gga snatch yo b-tch and rape yo honey." 

Like a slimy defense attorney leading the witness, our excited interviewer aids and abets the rapper, pointedly asking, "Do you sometimes feel the public is far too judgmental about lyrics?"

"Sometimes it's a good thing," responds Ross. "And us being artists, that's our job to clarify the sensitive things that really need to be clarified."

Putting aside that Rick Ross called himself an "artist" with a straight face, he's right that sometimes, things have to be clarified. But it's hard for even the most ardent Rozay fan to read the lines as anything other than a swing-and-a-miss attempt to capitalize on a drug trend and be clever.

So to all the "queens" and "sexy ladies" on Rick Ross's timeline: Ignore that Ross neither apologized nor took responsibility for a horribly-thought-out verse. He's the Bawse. You should be apologizing to him for questioning his judgment.