MIAMI, FL - JUNE 11: (EXCLUSIVE ACCESS) J. Cole visits Y 100 Radio station on June 11, 2013 in Miami, Florida. (Photo by Larr
Larry Marano/Getty Images

In a lengthy blog post published over the weekend,  J. Cole apologized for lyrics on his verse to Drake's "Jodeci Freestyle" that some have criticized for mocking people with autism.

On the Drake track, Cole rhymes, "Go check the numbers dummy, that's just me gettin' started/I'm artistic, you n-ggas is autistic, retarded."

"These lyrics are offensive and perpetuate negative stereotypes," said autism advocacy group Autism Speaks. "There are many inspiring individuals with autism and other disabilities who have achieved great success across a variety of artforms, including music. We encourage J. Cole to recognize their talents and learn from the positive example they have set for all of us."

Cole must've heard the message, tweeting an apology with a link to a 375-word lengthier blog post:

"Last week, when I first saw a comment from someone outraged about the lyric, I realized right away that what I said was wrong," the rapper wrote. "I was instantly embarrassed that I would be ignorant enough say something so hurtful. What makes the crime worse is that I should have known better.

"I want to educate myself more on Autism, and I’ll gladly own my mistake and serve as an example to today’s generation that there’s nothing cool about mean-spirited comments about someone with Autism. People with this disorder and their loved ones have to go through so much already, the last thing they need is to hear something as ignorant as what I said. I understand."

This apology isn't enough for some advocates, though. Kevin Healey, ambassador for the National Autistic Society and founder of Autism Radio UK who helped bring the lyric to attention, told Fuse, "He has apologized, which is good, however he shouldn't have used the lyrics in the first place. As a leading campaigner for autism and a person living with autism, I find it very offensive. He still needs to remove that one line from the song; either dub it over or completely remove it. I speak for thousands of people with autism, so please do the right thing and remove it."

J. Cole's full apology below:

 Recently there’s been a trend that includes rappers saying something offensive, only to be attacked for it in the media and pressured to apologize. I have to be completely honest and say there’s a part of me that resents that. I view rap similar to how I view comedy. It’s going to ruffle feathers at times. It’s going to go “too far”. I do not believe that an apology is needed every time someone is offended, especially when that apology is really only for the sake of saving an endorsement or cleaning up bad press.

With that said, this is not the case today. This letter is sincere.
This apology IS necessary.

In a recent verse on the song “Jodeci Freestyle”, I said something highly offensive to people with Autism. Last week, when I first saw a comment from someone outraged about the lyric, I realized right away that what I said was wrong. I was instantly embarrassed that I would be ignorant enough say something so hurtful. What makes the crime worse is that I should have known better.

To the entire Autism community who expressed outrage, I’m moved and  inspired by your passion, and I’m amazed at how strong you are as a unit. I have now read stories online from parents about their struggles and triumphs with raising an Autistic child and I admire how incredibly strong you have to be to do so. It’s touching. It also makes what I said even more embarrassing for me. I feel real shame. You have every right to be angry.

To anyone suffering from Autism, either mildly or severely, I am sorry. I’m bound to make mistakes in my life, but in my heart I just want to spread Love.

I want to educate myself more on Autism, and I’ll gladly own my mistake and serve as an example to today’s generation that there’s nothing cool about mean-spirited comments about someone with Autism. People with this disorder and their loved ones have to go through so much already, the last thing they need is to hear something as ignorant as what I said. I understand.

To the parents who are fighting through the frustrations that must come with raising a child with severe autism, finding strength and patience that they never knew they had; to the college student with Asperger’s Syndrome; to all those overcoming Autism. You deserve medals, not disrespect. I hope you accept my sincere apology.

Much Love

-Cole