NEW YORK - FEBRUARY 1997: American rap artist ODB (Ol' Dirty Bastard) of the rap group Wu-Tang Clan poses for a February 1997
Bob Berg

The crowd gathered at the Brooklyn Academy of Music last night for the premiere of an Ol' Dirty Bastard documentary were left wanting when a cease and desist order kept the film from being played.

According to AllHipHop, many of the founding members of the Wu Tang Clan as well as close friends and family members of the late rapper were in the audience for the screening of “Dirty: Platinum Edition." The doc was a scheduled part of the NuHo Film Festival.

But after a pre-screening Q and A session with Cappadonna and Popa Wu, NuHo's owner and managing partner, Chris Kanik, announced that the film would not be happening at the request of "the ex-wife."

There was speculation that ODB's ex, Icelene Jones, was behind the order, but there has been no direct verification as of yet. 

Luckily, RZA was contacted via Skype and launched into a diatribe on copyright laws and lawyers. Here's a snippet:

“I don’t understand how ODB, who passed away nine years ago, who has children, who has family members who are sitting right there in that audience, he has fans who have supported his music, he’s a part of the Wu Tang Legacy…I can’t see how a lawyer, who never met him personally, can stop this film from being shown to the public.

Kanik then decided to stick up for lawyers everywhere and said “It's not a lawyer, its the estate…the widow."

After all this, the audience was understandably irritated and police were eventually called to calm the situation down.

This would have been an excellent time for that badass ODB hologram from Rock the Bells to appear. Alas, it did no such thing.