Tyler the Creator performs live at Scoot Inn during SXSW on March 13, 2014 in Austin, Texas.
Ariel LeBeau for Fuse

Update, March 17: Just hours after his arrest Tyler, the Creator secured the necessary $25,000 bond for bail and performed a sold-out show at the House of Blues in Dallas.

Update, March 16: The bail set for Tyler, the Creator, after his arrest on Saturday for allegedly inciting a riot, has been raised from $3,500 to $25,000. The rapper was charged with Riot-Class A Misdemeanor. 

Update, March 15: Tyler, the Creator was arrested by the Austin Police Department for allegedly inciting a riot during his Thursday performance at SXSW, the Associated Press reports.

The Odd Future rapper was detained at Austin-Bergstrom Airport and is being held on $3,500 bail. Roger Wade, Travis County Sheriff's spokesman, said the rapper "encouraged behavior causing an immediate danger and injury to persons." Tyler's publicist declined commenting to the AP. 

If convicted of inciting a riot, Tyler could face up to a year in jail and $4,000 fine.

Fuse's original account of that concert is below.

Odd Future are known for their unpredictability: you enter one of their shows at your own risk. If there is any method to their madness, it has something to do with mosh pits and violence.

The group's leader, Tyler, the Creator finds humor in it all. Headlining the second night of Converse and Thrasher Magazine's Death Match party, he took to the stage for his 30-minute set in an usual timely fashion.

The outdoor venue was at capacity. After his opening song, "Jamba" from 2013's Wolf, Tyler demanded that security let everyone outside to be let in. The crowd took this to mean they could scale -- and effectively destroy -- the venue's makeshift walls. A combination of wooden planks, sheet metal and barb wire couldn't hold the dozens hoping to enter, and fans attempted to climb the flimsy walls, bending and breaking them in the process. Some rammed the wood with their feet, bags, anything until it fell apart. A young man slashed his palms gripping barbed wire in a final attempt to get into the venue. Security was armed with drills to rebuild it. Cops feared Tyler would entice a full blown riot. 

After the stampede, Tyler's sound was cut off—a decision which, according to a bouncer, came from the police who circled the venue. After a few chants of "Tyler!" and "Let him play!" the rapper returned.

Tyler yelled to the sound guy who had cut his mic: "Sorry, I just wanted everyone in here." After the sound guy flipped him off, he yelled back, "So f--k you too. I'm just trying to be nice to the a--hole." He then launched into his unfortunately titled hit "B--tch Suck Dick."

At this point a security guard came around the back and began threatening to pepper spray the teens lining the venue. 

This didn't stop Tyler. He managed to get those bloodied and bruised to shout "Jason Derulo," mimicking a popular YouTube clip of Derulo singing his own name for 57 minutes. Later some kid in the audience yelled "Take my sandwich!" and threw it at the rapper, who immediately caught it. 

The tense and dangerous set came at a sensitive time: The previous evening a driver fleeing Austin police killed two people and injured many more right outside a bar where Tyler was scheduled to take the stage. That performance was cancelled. The rapper made no mention of the incident while on stage.

Check out all of Fuse's coverage of SXSW 2014, including our continuously updated list of the festival's best moments.