He's back, baby! Drake surprised the internet Saturday by dropping not one, not two, but three previously unreleased tracks. Is someone trying to steal Taylor Swift's thunder

"6 God," "How Bout Now," and "Heat of the Moment" arrive a year after Drizzy's spectacular Nothing Was The Same. No word on whether or not the songs will appear on the Toronto rapper's highly anticipated fourth full-length Views from the 6, arriving next year. 

Explaining the release, Drizzy tweeted, "That wasn't an EP. Just 3 songs that I knew some hackers had. But enjoy! Back to this album."

Of the three songs Drake shared, "6 God" is probably the most confident. His lines are vicious and delivered with incredible ferocity. From the beginning, the rapper is at his most intense, announcing, "I'll admit it, I'll admit it / Watch your motherf*cking tone, boy." He later almost scream-raps, "Got me feeling like a ball hog / I don't pass it when I get it." 

"How Bout Now" is for the Rihanna conspiracy theorists. It's a somber tune, with Drake battling internal demons and realizing he had terrible timing with an unnamed woman. He raps, "Started drinking way more than I used to / People form habits like that, girl / Man enough to tell you I was hurt that year / I'm not even Christian, still went to church that year / I just had to pretend that year / I didn't even see my friends that year." The song comes to a resolution with Drizzy asking his lady love to give him another shot, "You ain't really f*ck with me way back then but how bout now?" Throw in producers Boi-1da and Jordan Evans and you've got a classic Drake jam.

The last track is "Heat of the Moment," a collaboration with long-time Drake producer 40. Of the three, this tune stands out simply because Drake doesn't rap—he sings the entire time. It opens with, "All the school kids are so sick of books and learning / They don't read anymore / They don't even read anymore / They just want to be like all the rappers that I can't stand." If there was ever a way to bash a bunch of your colleagues in a melodic fashion, this is how to do it. The rest of the six-minute song is equally as critical, discussing society and everyone's place inside of it: Who will you be when it's all over? Listen below.