File this one under bizarre North American phenomenons. It's known as the McBarge, a floating McDonald's restaurant designed for the World Expo in 1986 in Vancouver, British Columbia. The establishment was created to impress, and has continued to do so decades later.

The building now floats on the Fraser River in Mission, British Columbia, completely abandoned. All together now: I'm lovin' it!

The Canadian McBarge wasn't the only one of its kind—Roadtrippers.com reports that the first floating Micky D's was actually built in St. Louis, Missouri as an homage to the steamboat. These crazy sea-bound restaurants, Bobbea.com explains, were fashioned with a changing attitude towards elegance:

"There was a shift in public attitude during that time. The Yuppies were forsaking all things blatantly cheap. Hot-dogs, diners and the Five and Dime were out. Quiche, Bistros and boutiques were in. McDonalds, a company that prided itself on affordability, was loosing a part of the young adult market to eating establishments that portrayed themselves as high brow. Because of this, McDonalds tried out a new concept in 1986—"affordable elegance." Their flagship restaurant at Expo 86 was built more in the style of a bistro than a McDonald's. Because it was a costly venture, the McDonalds was built as a floating restaurant so it could be easily moved to another location."

Watch a guy explore the derelict dining room above.