Capitol Records/Roswell

To this day when the 1995 self-titled debut album by Foo Fighters comes up in conversation, fans fall into a daze of dilated rock lore: "I still can't believe Dave Grohl recorded the whole album himself!" "The early version was dubbed to cassette tapes and handed out for free with no clues as to the singer's identity—can you imagine if you'd gotten one of those tapes?" Or, "Man, the guys from Sunny Day Real Estate really traded up." 

All of the above has tugged at the strings of nostalgia and fandom dangling from '90s-loving hearts over the last 20 years, bolstering one of the most prolific rock legacies for a band still practicing today.

Referencing the making of the July '95 release, a once unconfident Grohl was quoted as saying:

"I thought that this would be some sort of cathartic therapy, to go out and record these songs that I'd written by myself... I was insecure about my voice. You know how people double their vocals to make them stronger? That album the vocals are quadrupled. I didn't want to be a lead singer, I couldn't fucking sing."

To think Grohl's catharsis put him on a path to GRAMMY-award winning success, countless sold-out arena shows, and his own chapter in the history of rock proves that true carte blanche really does exist for anyone willing to persevere amidst adversity. Celebrate the post-grunge legends and their 20th albumversary by revisiting Foo Fighters' self-titled this week. 

Tune into Fuse today at 2/1c—Thursday, July 9—for videos surrounding the debut Foo Fighters album.