The first issue of Playboy magazine with Marilyn Monroe on the cover and signed by Hugh Hefner on page three is displayed at
FREDERIC J. BROWN/AFP/Getty Images

Magazine redesigns are frequent and standard; Playboy, launched in 1953, is getting its latest in March. There's sort of a big note about this one, though, as nude photos will no longer be part of the once boundary-pushing publication. 

That's the sound of everyone who's ever said "I read it for the articles" racking up 100,000 cred points. (Which is the way things should be; have you read a Playboy Interview?)

The magazine's decades-long duel against puritanical American values around sexuality and nudity "has been fought and won," according to Playboy CEO Scott Flanders. “You’re now one click away from every sex act imaginable for free," he tells the New York Times. "And so it’s just passé at this juncture.”

Editor-in-chief Hugh Hefner, 89, signed off on the plan. The Playmate of the Month feature is safe; the NYT says it'll go forward in a more "PG-13" manner, "like the racier sections of Instagram."

The Times notes that the magazine's circulation stood at 5.6 million in 1975; 40 years later, it's at 800,000. That arc is the norm for this area of publishing:

"Though detailed figures are not kept for adult magazines, many of those that remain exist in severely diminished form, available mostly in specialist stores. Penthouse, perhaps the most famous Playboy competitor, responded to the threat from digital pornography by turning even more explicit. It never recovered."

Playboy.com removed its nude content in August 2014. "As a result," the NYT writes, "Playboy executives said, the average age of its reader dropped from 47 to just over 30, and its web traffic jumped to about 16 million from about four million unique users per month." Seems like they're onto something.