The English heavy metal band Iron Maiden performs a live concert at the Scandinavian heavy metal festival Copenhell in Copenh
Gonzales Photo/Christian Hjorth/Getty Images

Correction: An earlier headline misinterpreted this story. Iron Maiden's plane did not crash; it sustained damage while on the ground.

After performing to a sold-out crowd of 58,000 in Santiago, Chile at the Estadio Nacional on Saturday night (Mar. 12), Iron Maiden's Boeing 747 jet experienced a pretty major accident on an airport runway.

In a posting on the band's Facebook page, Iron Maiden details the accident—which occurred while the plane was being towed to a refueling station. “The steering pin that is part of the mechanism that connects the ground tug to the aircraft seemingly fell out,” the post explained. “On making a turn the aircraft had no steering and collided with the ground tug badly."

Two of the aircraft's engines were damaged, in addition to the plane's undercarriage. The incident also injured two of the airport's ground tug operators, who were immediately transported to the hospital, according to the BBC

Iron Maiden notes that all band members left the scene of the accident uninjured, and that it was monitoring the progress of the two hospitalized airport workers.

Here's a picture of one of the jet's damaged engines, courtesy of Iron Maiden's Twitter: 

The accident hasn't posed enough of a setback to delay the band's current South American tour in promotion of its new record, Book of Souls. In a follow-up Facebook post on Saturday night, Iron Maiden's co-manager, Rod Smallwood noted that this evening's performance in Cordoba, Colombia is continuing as planned. 

Smallwood also notes that the band's plane, famously known as Ed Force One, is currently being repaired while the band shops for a temporary replacement:

"We are happy to tell our fans in Cordoba that our Killer Krew has sorted out all logistics for us to be there with our full show for you all tomorrow. We expect no disruption to the tour in any way and are looking for a replacement 747 Ed Force One while our current beauty is healed. More news on that later. Until then, believe me, we will get to you all on this tour one way or another wherever you are."

Both airport workers injured in Chile are expected to make full recoveries, according to Smallwood.