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New snippets from Beyoncé's highly anticipated Elle U.K. magazine cover story are showing up in various places online, and they really go hard in the feminism and "Formation"-ism departments. Asked about the widespread, largely conservative misapprehension of her new single and video, she reportedly replied (h/t For Harriet):

"I mean, I'm an artist and I think the most powerful art is usually misunderstood. But anyone who perceives my message as anti-police is completely mistaken. I have so much admiration and respect for officers and the families of the officers who sacrifice themselves to keeps us safe. But let's be clear: I am against police brutality and injustice. Those are two separate things. If celebrating my roots and culture during Black History Month made anyone uncomfortable, those feelings were there long before a video and long before me. I'm proud of what we created and I'm proud to be part of a conversation that is pushing things forward in a positive way."

Pretty—ahem—flawless response. 

She also talks about Destiny's Child's success empowering her from a young age ("I realized that we had the power to create whatever vision we wanted for ourselves") and her, again, rampantly, typically hollowly critiqued feminism:

"I'm not really sure people know or understand what a feminist is, but it's very simple. It's someone who believes in equal rights for men and women. I don't understand the negative connotation of the word or why it should exclude the opposite sex."

She later expounds:

"I don't like or embrace any label. I don't want calling myself a feminist to make it feel like that's my one priority over racism or sexism or anything else. I'm just exhausted by labels and tired of being boxed in. If you believe in equal rights, the same way society allows a man to express his darkness, to express his pain, to express his sexuality, to express his opinion—I feel that women have the same rights."

Beyoncé pairs many of her feminism thoughts with the straightforward guidelines of what we want for our daughters as well as our sons. "Ask anyone, man or woman," she says, "'Do you want your daughter to have 75 cents when she deserves $1?' What do you think the answer should be?"

Watch Elle.com for the full interview, and check out an official preview here.