via Andrés Muschietti (@andy_muschietti on Instagram)

THE LATEST (9/30/16): Principal photography on the It remake wrapped last week, according to director Andy Muschietti and his wife, Barbara, a producer on the film:


What's It about? A group of small-town Maine schoolchildren, the Losers' Club, fighting an ancient, shape-shifting evil that terrorizes the town of Derry every 27ish years. They return to Derry as adults for a rematch.

Release date: Sept. 8, 2017

Rating: R

Length: TBD 

Budget: Rumored in 2015 to be around $30 million

Is it a two-parter? That's the plan—with part one following the kids, part two following their adult selves—although a second part's not yet guaranteed

Release of Stephen King's 1,138-page novel: September 1986

Premiere of ABC three-hour miniseries: Nov. 18-20, 1990


Director: Andrés Muschietti, the Argentine writer/director who debuted with 2013's Mama, which starred Jessica Chastain and Game of Thrones' Nikolaj Coster-Waldau. 

Check out the Mama trailer to get a taste of Muschietti's talents:

Muschietti is also set to direct an adaptation of the video game Shadow of the Colossus. For It, he replaced Cary Fukunaga (True Detective, Beasts of No Nation).

Screenwriters: Chase Palmer, making his feature debut with It, and Gary Dauberman, who wrote Annabelle and its upcoming sequel, as well as the forthcoming films The Wolves at the Door and Within.

Cinematographer: Chung-hoon Chung, the South Korean Park Chan-wook go-to with credits including Thirst, the original OldboyStoker, Lady Vengeance and Me and Earl and the Dying Girl. Check out some of his highlights:


Bill Skarsgård as It, a.k.a. Pennywise the Clown, made famous by Tim Curry in the miniseries. The Swedish star of Hemlock Grove and The Divergent Series: Allegiant is the son of actor Stellan Skarsgård and brother of Alexander Skarsgård (True Blood) and Gustaf Skarsgård (Vikings). He's 18 years younger than Curry was in the miniseries, and he looks way different:

Skarsgård calls It "such an extreme character," "inhumane" and "beyond even a sociopath." He also notes that "Tim Curry’s performance was truly great, but it’s important for me to do something different because of that."

Jaeden Lieberher as Bill Denbrough, the stuttering leader of the Losers' Club. His credits include Showtime's Masters of Sex and Cameron Crowe's Aloha. He's also carried movies alongside Bill Murray (St. Vincent) and Clive Owen (The Confirmation).

Sophia Lillis as Beverly Marsh, the only girl in the Losers' Club, romantic foil for Bill Denbrough, Ben Hanscom's ultimate crush. Lillis did Julie Taymor's A Midsummer Night's Dream movie and this October's 37, about the murder of Kitty Genovese.

Jeremy Ray Taylor as Ben Hanscom, the Losers' Club's overweight heart and soul. Taylor's had minor appearances in 42 and Ant-Man.

Jack Grazer as Eddie Kaspbrak, the Losers' Club's resident hypochondriac asthmatic. Grazer appeared in 2015's horror-comedy anthology Tales of Halloween. 

Finn Wolfhard as Richie Tozier, the wise-cracking, impressions-obsessed member of the Losers' Club. Wolfhard broke out in summer '16 with his turn as one of Stranger Things' main characters, Mike Wheeler. The series has gotten comparisons to It and Stephen King's work in general.

Chosen Jacobs as Mike Hanlon, the bully Henry Bowers' most-hated Losers' Club's member.

Wyatt Oleff as Stanley Uris. Oleff's shown up in Guardians of the Galaxy and Once Upon a Time.

Nicholas Hamilton as Henry Bowers, the Losers' Club's non-supernatural antagonist. Hamilton's an alum of Strangerland and Captain Fantastic. He's also got a role in the long-awaited adaptation of Stephen King's The Dark Tower.

Jake Sim as Belch Huggins. Previous credits include the TV shows Raising Expectations and Stella and Sam, plus voice work on Arthur.

Owen Teague as Patrick Hockstetter, a member of Henry's gang, previously worked on Netflix's Bloodline and the 2016 movie adaptation of Stephen King's Cell.


First looks at Pennywise:


The House on Neibolt Street:

Bill Denbrough's faithful steed:



From January 2016: Just a doodle, or an inky Pennywise preview?


September 1986: Stephen King publishes It, clocking in at 1,138 pages.

November 1990: ABC premieres a two-night It miniseries starring Tim Curry, Annette O'Toole, John Ritter, Dennis Christopher, Harry Anderson, Richard Thomas, Tim Reid, Richard Masur and Michael Cole. It's directed by Tommy Lee Wallace (The Twilight Zone, Fright Night Part 2), who co-wrote the script with Lawrence D. Cohen (credits on the original Carrie and the remake, plus the Tommyknockers miniseries).

March 2009: The It remake is announced. In the early stages, it's planned as a single film. Invasion writer David Kajganich starts tackling the script.

June 2012: Cary Fukunaga is announced as the director; he'll co-write a new script with Chase Palmer. At the time, Fukunaga's done Sin Nombre and Jane Eyre. He'll go on to direct Beasts of No Nation and the entire first season of HBO's True Detective.

December 2014: Producer Dan Lin announces that It will arrive in two parts. “The book is so epic that we couldn’t tell it all in one movie and service the characters with enough depth,” Lin tells Vulture, adding that Fukunaga is only contracted to direct the first film, although he's nearing a deal to co-write part two. He says things are going well:

“The most important thing is that Stephen King gave us his blessing. We didn’t want to make this unless he felt it was the right way to go, and when we sent him the script, the response that Cary got back was, ‘Go with God, please! This is the version the studio should make.’ So that was really gratifying.”

May 2015: English 23-year-old Will Poulter (We're the Millers, The Maze Runner, The Revenant) is cast as Pennywise.

Later that month, Fukunaga drops out as director. Stephen King reacts:

July 2015: Argentina's Andrés Muschietti (Mama) is announced as the new director.

September 2015: Fukunaga explains his "quietly acrimonious" exit to Variety, saying "every little thing was being rejected and asked for changes":

“I was trying to make an unconventional horror film. It didn’t fit into the algorithm of what they knew they could spend and make money back on based on not offending their standard genre audience. ... They didn’t care about that. In the first movie, what I was trying to do was an elevated horror film with actual characters. They didn’t want any characters. They wanted archetypes and scares. I wrote the script. They wanted me to make a much more inoffensive, conventional script. But I don’t think you can do proper Stephen King and make it inoffensive. The main difference was making Pennywise more than just the clown. After 30 years of villains that could read the emotional minds of characters and scare them, trying to find really sadistic and intelligent ways he scares children, and also the children had real lives prior to being scared. And all that character work takes time. It’s a slow build, but it’s worth it, especially by the second film. But definitely even in the first film, it pays off. ... Every little thing was being rejected and asked for changes. ... We didn’t want to make the same movie. We’d already spent millions on pre-production. I certainly did not want to make a movie where I was being micro-managed all the way through production, so I couldn’t be free to actually make something good for them. I never desire to screw something up. I desire to make something as good as possible/ We invested years and so much anecdotal storytelling in it. Chase and I both put our childhood in that story. So our biggest fear was they were going to take our script and bastardize it. So I’m actually thankful that they are going to rewrite the script. I wouldn’t want them to stealing our childhood memories and using that. I mean, I’m not sure if the fans would have liked what I would had done. I was honoring King’s spirit of it, but I needed to update it. King saw an earlier draft and liked it.”

October 2015: Muschietti tells Variety of his 1980s-set version: “King described '50s terror iconography. And I feel there’s a whole world now to rediscover, to update. There won’t be [mummies], werewolves. Terrors are going to be a lot more surprising."

January 2016: Muschietti posts a photo from Bangor, Maine:

February 2016: Producer Roy Lee reveals that Fukunaga and Palmer's script has been rewritten and explains that It is now structured as two films—one about the Losers' Club fighting It as kids, the other about them battling It as adults:

“It is very close to the source material in one way but very different if you look at it as a literary piece of work… We’re taking it and making the movie from the point of view of the kids, and then making another movie from the point of view of the adults, that could potentially then be cut together like the novel. But it’s gonna be a really fun way of making this movie.”

June 2016: Bill Skarsgård is announced as Pennywise. Shooting begins.

July 2016: First look at Pennywise, a close-up, unveiled by Entertainment Weekly. (See IMAGERY section, above.) Bill Skarsgård comments: 

“It’s such an extreme character. Inhumane. It’s beyond even a sociopath, because he’s not even human. He’s not even a clown. I’m playing just one of the beings It creates. ... It truly enjoys the shape of the clown Pennywise, and enjoys the game and the hunt. What’s funny to this evil entity might not be funny to everyone else. But he thinks it’s funny.”

He also acknowledges the Tim Curry–shaped elephant in the room:

“It’s important that we do something fresh and original for this one. It’s purposely not going toward that weird, greasy look. ... Tim Curry’s performance was truly great, but it’s important for me to do something different because of that. I’ll never be able to make a Tim Curry performance as good as Tim Curry.”

King reacts simply, telling EW: “It’s a scary clown. But to me they’re all scary.”

Also, Northumberland News shares photos from Port Hope, Ontario, the Derry, Maine stand-in. (See IMAGERY, above.) A cinema marquee advertises Batman and Lethal Weapon 2, meaning we'll be visiting the summer of 1989.

August 2016: Entertainment Weekly publishes the first full-body photo of the new Pennywise. Costume designer Janie Bryant, an Emmy-winner with experience on Mad Men, Deadwood and the 2009 remake of The Last House on the Left, says the costume reflects bygone eras— Elizabethan, Victorian, Renaissance—as a nod to It's ancient, many-faced aspect:

“The costume definitely incorporates all these otherworldly past lives, if you will. He is definitely a clown from a different time. ... There is almost a doll-like quality to the costume. The pants being short, the high waistline of the jacket, and the fit of the costume is a very important element. It gives the character a child-like quality."

Producer Dan Lin gives Collider an update:

“Really great chemistry is always a challenging thing with a movie like It because you’re casting kids who don’t have a ton of experience, but it ended up being really natural. Each kid, like a Goonies or Stand By Me, has a very specific personality and they’re forming the Loser’s Club obviously. And now finally the evil force is coming into our movie. We’ve spent a few months getting the kids to bond and now they’re going to fight this evil, scary clown."

He also comments on Skarsgård as Pennywise:

"His build is really interesting. He’s really tall and lanky, and feels a little clown-like in his movement. When he came in—we had a lot of different actors read, and when he came in he had a different spin on the character that got us really excited. You’ve had Heath Ledger doing almost a clown Joker, you’ve seen obviously Tim Curry as a clown. We wanted someone who created a Pennywise character that would stand on its own and Bill came in and created this character that frankly freaked us out."

Next, watch actor/filmmaker Rider Strong (Cabin Fever, Boy/Girl Meets World) break down his five favorite horror movies for Fuse: