Inez & Vinoodh for Harper's Bazaar

Lady Gaga is the cover star of the 150th anniversary issue of Harper's Baazer, and the singer penned an essay about womanhood for the magazine. She has expressed her solidarity with women of all ages and backgrounds since the beginning of her career, but with Joanne, her most honest album to date, the pop star's stance has become even stronger.

The gorgeous photoshoot is riddled with vintage high-fashion looks, yet Gaga is focused on modern feminism and the future for her essay. Her 30th birthday made her realize "I want to be somebody who is fighting for what's true—not for more attention, more fame, more accolades":

"I look at my mother and the way she has loved my father through his pain, and I look at my grandmothers and what they've been through—the three of them are like a trifecta of strength. Health, happiness, love—these are the things that are at the heart of a great lady, I think. That's the kind of lady I want to be. You know, I never thought I'd say this, but isn't it time to take off the corsets? As someone who loves them, I think it's time to take them off."

Gaga continues to explain that being a woman in 2016 is being a fighter and survivor, but also knowing how to be vulnerable and owning your emotions. She writes,

"Before I made Joanne, I took some time off. I made music with Tony Bennett. I did "Til It Happens to You" with Diane Warren. But I was able to get off the train of endless work I'd been on, which was quite abusive to my body and my mind, and have some silence and some space around me. I wanted to experience music again the way I did when I was younger, when I just had to make it, instead of worrying what everybody thinks or being obsessed with things that aren't important."

The singer's Joanne album (released on Oct. 21) reflects that last sentence, as she opens up about her connection to her late aunt that inspired the LP, dedicates a song to her friend who's battling cancer, discusses #BlackLivesMatter and even unapologetically muses about masturbation. 

Below, watch Lady Gaga explain the inspiration behind Artpop: