LAS VEGAS, NV - SEPTEMBER 18:  Singer Christina Grimmie attends the 2015 iHeartRadio Music Festival at MGM Grand Garden Arena
Isaac Brekken/Getty Images for iHeartMedia

Christina Grimmie's family has filed a lawsuit against AEG Live, the event company that handled their daughter's last concert before she was fatally shot at the show's meet-and-greet on June 10 in Orlando. 

According to Billboard, the lawsuit also names The Orlando Philharmonic Orchestra Plaza Foundation, which owns the Plaza Live venue, and the security company that worked the show. The family alleges wrongful death and negligent infliction of emotional distress caused from Christina's death.

Grimmie's parents and brother claim the involved parties "failed to take adequate security measures to ensure the safety of the performers and the attendees at the concert venue" and only conducted "superficial bag checks" on concert-goers, rather than using body pat-downs or metal detectors. Grimmie had been shot by Kevin Loibl, who carried in two 9mm Glock handguns, two full magazines and a large hunting knife undetected, the lawsuit says.

As Billboard writes, "Grimmie's family requests a recovery the future support the singer would have provided to her family members, the singer's projected income after taxes had she lived to normal life expectancy and any and all medical and funeral expenses paid."

They claim there was some fishiness going on at the venue, which had a brand-new general manager working and had usually done a great security in the past, but not on that night.

Since the singer's untimely death, we've seen four posthumous music videos that show her gaining confidence. Her movie, The Matchbreaker, premiered in October.