SAN DIEGO, CA - JULY 10: (L-R) Actors Carrie Fisher, Mark Hamill and Harrison Ford applaud onstage at the Lucasfilm panel dur
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Many have paid tribute to Star Wars actor Carrie Fisher after her untimely death at 60, but on Monday, her most famous co-star Mark Hamill stepped in with one long, guest column for The Hollywood Reporter to remember Fisher, who suffered a heart attack on a cross-country flight in December.

In the letter, he wrote about meeting Fisher for the first time:

"You know, she was 19 years old at the time. I was a worldly 24. So I was thinking, 'Oh my God, it'll be like working with a high school kid.' But I was just bowled over. I mean she was just so instantly ingratiating and funny and outspoken. She had a way of just being so brutally candid. I'd just met her but it was like talking to a person you'd known for ten years."

Hamill also detailed their relationship over the years—the good and the bad—carefully displaying that not all friendships are perfect, but they are beautiful.

"We ran the gamut over the years, where we were in love with each other, where we hated each other's guts. 'I'm not speaking to you, you're such a judgmental, royal brat!' We went through it all. It's like we were a family.

"When you were in her good graces, you couldn't have more fun with any person on the planet. She was able to make you feel like you were the most important thing in her life. I think that's a really rare quality. And then you could go 180 degrees opposite, where you were furious with one another and wouldn't speak for weeks and weeks. But that's all part of what makes a relationship complete. It's not all one sided. Like I say, she was a handful. She was high maintenance. But my life would have been so much drabber and less interesting if she hadn't been the friend that she was."

Perhaps the cutest part? Reading Hamill's thoughts on Fisher's laugh:

The lengths I would go to hear her laugh — there were no limits. I loved her and loved making her laugh. She would do these crazy things and make me do these crazy things, but I really don’t think they were crazy after all. In a way, it was a defense mechanism for her. She was so off the wall, she could use it as protection. Part of what was so poignant about her was that she was vulnerable, that there was this glimmer of a little girl that was so appealing and it roused the protective nature in my personality.

Go read the full letter on THR.