Lloyd Bishop/NBC/NBCU Photo Bank via Getty Images

Fuse is celebrating Women's History Month by looking at a variety of rising forces who are creating Future Women's History before our eyes. Today we honor Canadian actress and activist Ellen Page.

Page was born in Halifax, Nova Scotia in 1987. She started acting at age 10, building up to a few episodes of Trailer Park Boys and, in 2005, a starring role in Hard Candy. Shortly after, she played Kitty Pryde in 2006's X-Men: The Last Stand and the pregnant teen lead in '07's indie breakout Juno, which served as Diablo Cody's first screenplay and Jason Reitman's second directorial effort. 

At the Oscars, Juno got four major-category nods. Nominated a month before her 21st birthday, Ellen Page became the third-youngest woman to ever compete for Best Actress.

On Valentine's Day 2014, Page spoke at a Human Rights Campaign Foundation conference, Time to THRIVE, about protecting and investing in LGBTQ youth. "And I am here today because I am gay," she shared, five minutes in. "And because maybe I can make a difference to help others have an easier and more hopeful time."

Page spoke of feeling, as an actress, "a personal obligation and a social responsibility," and of being "tired of lying by omission." Shortly after, she said:

"And we deserve to experience love fully, equally, without shame, and without compromise. There are too many kids out there suffering from bullying, rejection or simply being mistreated because of who they are. Too many dropouts. Too much abuse. Too many homeless. Too many suicides. You can change that, and you are changing it."

The Advocate put her on their 40 Under 40 list that year, calling her "this generation's gay A-lister."

Also a vegan, Page has become a reliable voice of truth regarding feminism, film industry sexism and oppressed groups. She's said she finds that "the whole reason to go to a film is to disappear into another world, and to have your humanity connect with someone else’s, who you might not ever meet in your life!" On social media, she promotes progressive causes and rallies, and is always ready to criticize the Donald Trump regime. 

A year ago, Page helped launch the TV channel Viceland as the producer and co-host of Gaycation. Together with Ian Daniel over the course of two seasons, she has explored LGBTQ culture and obstacles in Japan, Jamaica, India, Ukraine and more. One episode saw Page and Daniel talking to people affected by the 2016 mass shooting at Orlando's Pulse nightclub. Gaycation received an Emmy nomination for Outstanding Unstructured Reality Program.

Should you worry about any Ellen Page–lessness in the near future, don't: she's got no less than five films coming up, and with each, a new opportunity to make the press rounds and keep waking up America—and the world.

We're celebrating Future Women's History all month long! Tune in to Fuse and come back to Fuse.tv every day for profiles, videos and more. Find Fuse in your area with our Channel Finder.