Wearing masks members of Russian punk group Pussy Riot, Nadezhda Tolokonnikova (L) and Maria Alyokhina (R), pose for a photo
EVGENY FELDMAN/AFP/Getty Images

Maria Alyokhina and Olga Borisova of Pussy Riot, the Russian punk rock protest group known for its politically charged songs and music videos, were briefly detained and released Aug. 7 for protesting the 20-year imprisonment of Ukrainian filmmaker Oleg Sentsov in Siberia. 

Sentsov was charged with plotting terrorism acts, but his lawyer argues Sentsov was forced to confess for crimes he didn't commit. Sentsov's lawyer once defended Pussy Riot in court.

"With a linen and a pink can we made a banner and placed it on the bridge in such a way that it could be seen by people and by and residents of houses opposite," Pussy Riot wrote on Facebook. "[Sentsov], after going through tortures during the investigation, was sentenced to 20 years in prison. The Sentsov and Kolchenko case is one of the main and key political issues in the history of Russia."

Pussy Riot updated fans and supporters on Twitter, tweeting a video of Alyokhina and Borisova's arrest and their subsequent release hours later:

Pussy Riot and Sentsov's supporters believe he was imprisoned because he opposed Crimea’s annexation, not because he was plotting terrorist acts. 

Alyokhina and fellow Pussy Riot member Nadezhda "Nadya" Tolokonnikova previously were arrested for hooliganism in February 2012 after they staged an anti-Vladimir Putin performance inside an Orthodox cathedral. Years later, Pussy Riot released the "I Can't Breathe" music video partly because, like Sentsov, they felt as though they "were being consistently buried alive by the annexation of Crimea." In the one-take video (watch below), the group is slowly buried alive by thick soil to represent the unrest in Russia.

In other protest news, watch LGBTQ member and advocate Otep Shamaya of nu metal band Otep tell Fuse about performing in Russia despite the country's anti-LGBTQ stances: