It director Andy Muschietti is currently enjoying the massive success of the movie, but he's already eyeing another Stephen King classic! Muschietti, along with his sister and producer Barbara, want to remake fan favorite Pet Sematary.

“My affection for Pet Sematary will go on until I die,” he told EW. “I will always dream about the possibility of making a movie.” Barbara added, 

“We’ll see who gets to it first. But it is the first Stephen King book that we read, and it’s something that has been a great love, because it is possibly King’s most personal book. You can imagine his young family. What will you do to be able to keep your family? How far would you go? “I really hope we can do it. But if we do it, we have to do it justice, like we did with It. The versions we read in the past years, the scripts we’ve read, have not been, in our opinion, representative of the book.”

King first published Pet Sematary in 1983, and the horror novel was turned into a movie (directed by Mary Lambert) in 1989. A sequel followed in 1992, but it didn't have the success as the original. But the Muschiettis have some competition! Back in 2015, Guillermo Del Toro said he would “would kill to make it on film.” But before they can even think of snagging the rights for Pet Sematary, New Line Studios is currently working on the It sequel. The team from the first movie are set to return to their respective titles, including screenwriter Gary Dauberman as well as producers Barbara Muschietti, Roy Lee, Dan Lin, Seth Grahame-Smith and David Katzenberg. Andy Muschietti, whose deal to helm the sequel (or Chapter Two) isn't in place yet, previously stated that another movie was always in the plan.

Unsurprisingly, the It remake completely shattered box-office records during its opening weekend, making a massive $123.1 million. It's also the biggest opening weekend from a horror film beating out previous record-holder 2011's Paranormal Activity 3 with its $52.6 million. Keep the scary vibes going with Ouija: Origin of Evil star Elizabeth Reaser explain how filming became "psychologically terrifying":