BATON ROUGE, LA - MAY 22: Taylor Swift performs on stage during "The 1989 World Tour" at LSU Tiger Stadium in Baton Rouge, LA
Christopher Polk/Getty Images for TAS

Looks like it's more "Bad Blood" for Taylor Swift. This weekend the 1989 star made Apple change its streaming policy with little more than a Tumblr post (that, my friends, is power). In it, Swift defended independent musicians, explaining that the service wouldn't pay artists for its three-month free trial period. They listened, and now folks are getting dough.

How far does her defense of indie artists go? To some photographers, not very far.

Yesterday music photographer Jason Sheldon penned an open letter to Swift, expressing his distaste for her live shot policy. He explains that the contract "appears to be a complete rights grab, and demands that you are granted free and unlimited use of our work, worldwide, in perpetuity." 

Today we learn that it's actually a bit stricter and Sheldon's contract was out of date. In the new version (check it out in the tweet below) we learn Swift and team have the right to destroy the equipment of any photographer who violates the document. 

So, what do you think? Would Swift's team go so far as to honor the contract and destroy a camera? Does her Apple triumph and defense of the underdog only extend to musicians? Tell us in the comments below, then explore Tay at her best: accepting a BRIT Award and getting arty in the "Style" video.