ATLANTA, GA - SEPTEMBER 19: Sam Smith performs on stage at Music Midtown in Piedmont Park on September 19, 2015 in Atlanta, G
Paul R. Giunta/WireImage

New James Bond theme song singer Sam Smith is on the cover of the new, suitably 007-ish NME. While the full story isn't available online yet, some intriguing bits are available.

Speaking about his trajectory as a gay man who came out at age 10, Smith says he aimed for his GRAMMY-winning debut album In the Lonely Hour to be as universally inclusive. "I wanted anyone, gay or straight, to be able to relate to me singing about men, like I was able to relate to Stevie Wonder or John Legend singing about girls."

Smith goes on to say:

"I want to be a spokesperson. I want to be a figure in the gay community, who speaks for gay men. I sell records in countries where gay men get killed and that’s a big thing for me, because maybe one person in that country will pick up my album, realise it’s by a gay artist, and it might change their opinion."

There's also a glimpse into Smith's history with the James Bond franchise; Daniel Craig was his first favorite 007, "because I’m 23 years old." Now he hopes Craig's successor can return to the "classy and clean-cut" style of Sean Connery or Roger Moore. Also, what's up with Sam's proclivity for sadness?

"I’ve had an amazing life, but I think I was born with a little bit of sadness in me. I’ve always been attracted to those things, whether it’s sad movies, sad music...when you’re sad, you feel everything in a greater way than you do when you’re happy. I’m a vulnerable, sensitive person. I overthink everything. I’m insanely self-conscious about my body, about my music, about everything in my life, and that self-consciousness is what’s keeping my feet on the ground at the moment. If I didn’t have it, I’d become a bit of a prick. I’m thankful for my sadness.”

Un-sad yourself with with the video for "Writing's on the Wall" and get even more pumped for Smith's just-announced Saturday Night Live appearance alongside DisclosureLorde's comin', too.